Chris Packham in an Edit Suite

Chris Packham’s Guide To Wildlife Presenting

With a whole host of enthusiastic natural historians out there it seems silly to think that more people can’t try their hand at presenting or narrating their own short wildlife films. But where do you start?

Chris Packham Presenting To Camera

Wildlife presenter Chris Packham gives his hints and tips for how to front your own short films.

Having enlisted the help of top broadcaster and Springwatch frontman Chris Packham we set out to encourage and inspire budding film-makers to step in front of the camera (or behind a microphone!) and demonstrate their passion to the world.

Let’s face it, we may not all have access to years of experience or the backing of a television production team, but a wildlife film is made much better when we can see it through the lens of a dedicated storyteller.

We’ve all dreamed of fronting our own natural history series – you can admit it to me – so the only thing left to do is refine the associated skills and techniques.

Episode 1 – Research, Positioning and Scripts

In our first film, Chris focuses his attention towards displaying the power of proper research, your camera angle considerations, and how to write and perform your script – all the time trying his best to control the attentions of a resplendent yet sexually charged male turkey.

Remember, while we want you to co-star in your films, your subject must always be the primary focus!

 

Episode 2 – Story, Narration and Sound

Our second film sees Chris using two species of predatory plant to exhibit some further presenting hints and tips. Although not the most animated of subjects (unless a fly stumbles in), Chris shows how a presenter or narrator can bring an otherwise stationary subject to life.

Here we touch on how to set out a story, what to leave out for your narration, how to be careful about the sound you record and how to make your film more acoustically interesting.

 

You certainly don’t have to load all of Chris’ tips into your wildlife film. We don’t want to make it too hectic and overloaded. However, applying a couple of the above techniques may help to deliver your film’s story and also convey your personality into your finished piece.

Give a few of them a try and see what you’re comfortable with – perhaps you’ll discover a hidden talent that you can unleash in your Eden Shorts competition entry.

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